Post 490

This sun with a face is a symbol used by Andres Bonifacio, the forefather of Philippine independence. The one in the picture forms part of a memorial to the Bonifacio brothers, the other being Procopio, who were killed by fellow revolutionaries, at the order of a rival, in a mountain in Maragondon, Cavite.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 488

Ann Pamintuan’s Stallion (2014) is a sculptural cocoon made of welded metal. She is particularly famous for this medium, with her designs usually inspired by nature.  This is located at the backyard of Museo Orlina in Tagaytay City.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 464

This sculpture of the nameless Filipino revolutionaries stands for more than a hundred years now, yet the struggle for a true revolution is probably far from completion. The sculpture is now titled Alaala ng Bayang Filipino sa mga Bayani ng (18)96 (literally “Homage of the Filipino People to the Heroes of 96”) and was made by Ramon Lazaro Martinez in 1911.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 456

Darnay Demetillo’s relief Atang features the iconic Oblation pose and the Cordilleran symbols, namely, the likeness of a rice deity bulul and the g-string garment. Behind the main figure is a traditional hut or balé. Atang means a ritual of offering to the spirits, the same meaning of oblation. This work adorns the administration building of the University of the Philippines – Baguio.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 426

Andres Bonifacio, without doubt, was a hero of the masses, one who had come to understand his people not with an elitist perspective of a colonially educated leader or cacique. While he championed freedom through an armed struggle, he fell not to colonial hands but to politics and betrayal of his own men he considered brothers.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 425

Buildings, like this one, used to be grand structures of a business district in old-time Manila. Now they are dilapidated and neglected, almost condemned. The ground area is teeming with roadside vendors; above, hints of artistry remain as silent witnesses of the change of the times. The figure is probably Hermes (Mercury) holding a caduceus but curiously not on his left arm.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

Post 422

This detail from sculptor Eduardo Castrillo’s Katuparan ng Pangarap ng Lahi (literally “Attainment of the aspiration of the people”) shows the child – the offspring – as an equally important figure in society. The young are protected and nurtured; they are the recipient of the fruits of all the hard work of the present.

Photo by I.R. Arenas