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Strings of clothes by the roadside make provincial life charming such as this scene.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

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For nearly five decades, the atrocities of Martial Law survive and evolve to new forms. The end of the Marcos regime has not sealed wounds of Martial Law as its scions and political enablers are now in power.

This is a scene from the musical version of the Lualhati Bautista’s novel Dekada 70, wonderfully adapted and directed by Pat Valera.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

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The Spanish setting of Federico Garcia Lorca’s La Casa de Bernarda Alba (The House of Bernarda Alba) easily fits the Philippine social environment because of the common conservative Catholic experience.

Bernarda Alba (Frances Makil-Ignacio) torments her all-female household with her controlling nature, which is influenced by the prevailing repression against women.

This was staged by Dulaang UP, directed by Alexander Cortez.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

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The dysfunctional political climate of the Philippines has its origins in the formation of the first republic, the obvious theme of the musical Mabining Mandirigma. Apolinario Mabini (Monique Wilson) counsels President Emilio Aguinaldo (David Ezra) who repeatedly falls for the schemes of the ilustrado elite.

Mabining Mandirigma was directed by Chris Millado from the libretto by Nicanor Tiongson and music by Joed Balsamo.

Photo by I.R. Arenas

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If He Doesn’t See Your Face by Suzue Toshiro is a domestic story set inside the strict Japanese prison visiting facility room. Here, the couple – the man being the prisoner – talk about family life and son, and reaffirm their love.

This was staged at the Areté arts hub of the Ateneo de Manila University, directed by Ricardo Abad, and starred by Brian Matthew Sy and Delphine Buencamino.

Photo by I.R. Arenas